Australian Open 2023: The antidiva Cristina Bucsa, without nets and with philosophy: “I like being free” | Sports

Cristina Bucsa was born 25 years ago in Chisinau, Moldova, although at the age of 3 she emigrated with her parents to Torrelavega. Sitting on a chair, she tells in Melbourne what her philosophy of life is, now that she is in the news for having achieved her first victory in Australia (2-6, 6-0 and 6-2 against Eva Lys) and having become the sixth Spanish who enters the top-100 of the WTA circuit. It is not a minor merit, far from it, although she has achieved access against the current, far from the modern prototype that is summarized in contracts, sponsorships, amenities and an exacerbated presence on social networks.

“I only have Facebook, but to talk to the girls and meet to train and play doubles. I don’t see it something for me. I don’t like to show photos of myself or personal things”, she says before the four journalists who fire questions at her, expressing herself naturally despite her inexperience. Bucsa, quoted in the second round with the Romanian Bianca Andreescu, champion of the US Open in 2019, says that she travels only accompanied by her father Ion de ella, that she has no trademarks to support her and that she is more philosophical than spiritual .

“I read about that and about how the human mind and body work,” he says. Also about Psychology, a career that he began to study through the UNED, although he later had to abandon it because the classes coincided with the Grand Slams. Unlike the vast majority of tennis players, she wears a shirt from one brand, pants from another, shoes from a third, and the racket is from a fourth. A minor detail, she says.

“I like to be free, the best thing is freedom. I don’t need to have a lot of clothes; with seven shirts, seven pants and skirts that’s enough for me, because if not, it’s a big expense. If someone comes now, we’ll talk… ”, adds the Spanish, who is 1.75m tall, hits the ball with her right foot and makes the most of her rackets because she doesn’t break them. “Nor the string, so I don’t change it. I don’t even know what voltage I use because my father takes care of that, ”she continues.

Bucsa speaks four languages ​​– Spanish, Romanian, English and French – and admires Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters. And now she has made a place for herself among the top hundred, something that by no means loses her sleep. He relativizes the Cantabra. “Being there doesn’t seem like something stratospheric to me. If you have to play previous ones, they are played; If I’m in the draw, fine, but my way of seeing tennis is different from that of other players”, concludes the tennis player, who defines herself as “open” and was summoned by Spain for the final phase of the Billie Jean King Cup , in November last year.

Bucsa, like Aliona Bolsova, a Catalan also born in Moldova, represents another way of facing the day-to-day of her sport. Today is simply different.

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